Reconciliation image

2019 Design

“Reconciliation should be ReconciliACTION. We need to see more hands-on reconciliation. This image portrays the strength of our people, holding on to sacred drum songs for the future generations. A pride was lost in the residential school system. CHILDREN taken from their families, hair cut off, are the connection to our past. Stripped of their identity... told to believe a new world. This image shows a young woman drumming and singing healing songs that were passed on from grandparents who suffered residential school terrors, but never lost their PRIDE, hiding their tears so the next generation could be proud of who they are and where they came from, protected by the eagle.” - Kalum Teke Dan

 

We've sold out of orange shirts!

If you placed your order with us you will receive it by Sept 27.

Thank you to all for your support! $1 from every t-shirt sold will be donated to the Jordan’s Principle Campaign.

Nelson greatly appreciates your support for Orange Shirt Day. Due to overwhelming demand, we are currently out of stock of t-shirts. We are working hard to supply more t-shirts to accommodate this high demand and hope to have t-shirts back on sale shortly. Thank You.

 

 

cover image

What is Jordan’s Principle?

Jordan’s Principle is a child first principle named in memory of Jordan River Anderson. Jordan was a First Nations child from Norway House Cree Nation in Manitoba. Born with complex medical needs, Jordan spent more than two years unnecessarily in hospital while the Province of Manitoba and the federal government argued over who should pay for his at home care. Jordan died in the hospital at the age of five years old, never having spent a day in his family home.

Jordan’s Principle ensures that First Nations children can access all public services when they need them. Services need to be culturally based and take into full account the historical disadvantage that many First Nations children live with. The government of first contact pays for the service and resolves jurisdictional/payment disputes later.

 

Why is Jordan’s Principle important?

Payment disputes within and between federal and provincial or territorial governments over services for First Nations children are common. First Nations children are frequently left waiting for services they desperately need, or are denied services that are available to other children. This includes, but is not limited to, services in education, health, early childhood services, recreation, and culture and language. Jordan’s Principle calls on the government of first contact to pay for the services without delay and seek reimbursement later so the child is not tragically caught in the middle of government red tape.

 

 

2019 Design

“Reconciliation should be ReconciliACTION. We need to see more hands-on reconciliation. This image portrays the strength of our people, holding on to sacred drum songs for the future generations. A pride was lost in the residential school system. CHILDREN taken from their families, hair cut off, are the connection to our past. Stripped of their identity... told to believe a new world. This image shows a young woman drumming and singing healing songs that were passed on from grandparents who suffered residential school terrors, but never lost their PRIDE, hiding their tears so the next generation could be proud of who they are and where they came from, protected by the eagle.” - Kalum Teke Dan

ORDER YOUR ORANGE SHIRT DAY T-SHIRT

T-Shirts are $9.95 + Free Standard Shipping. Proceeds will go to Jordan's Principles Campaign through the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society.

Nelson greatly appreciates your support for Orange Shirt Day. Due to overwhelming demand, we are currently out of stock of t-shirts. We are working hard to supply more t-shirts to accommodate this high demand and hope to have t-shirts back on sale shortly. Thank You.

2018 Orange T-Shirts

If you’re looking for the 2018 Orange Shirt Day T-Shirts, we still have some available in
Adult English, Youth English, Adult French, and Youth French sizes.

 

What is Jordan’s Principle?

Jordan’s Principle is a child first principle named in memory of Jordan River Anderson. Jordan was a First Nations child from Norway House Cree Nation in Manitoba. Born with complex medical needs, Jordan spent more than two years unnecessarily in hospital while the Province of Manitoba and the federal government argued over who should pay for his at home care. Jordan died in the hospital at the age of five years old, never having spent a day in his family home.

Jordan’s Principle ensures that First Nations children can access all public services when they need them. Services need to be culturally based and take into full account the historical disadvantage that many First Nations children live with. The government of first contact pays for the service and resolves jurisdictional/payment disputes later.

 

Why is Jordan’s Principle important?

Payment disputes within and between federal and provincial or territorial governments over services for First Nations children are common. First Nations children are frequently left waiting for services they desperately need, or are denied services that are available to other children. This includes, but is not limited to, services in education, health, early childhood services, recreation, and culture and language. Jordan’s Principle calls on the government of first contact to pay for the services without delay and seek reimbursement later so the child is not tragically caught in the middle of government red tape.