Every year on September 30th, we commemorate the survivors of residential schools and remember the children who did not survive. We invite everyone to join the journey toward reconciliation by buying an orange shirt with a special design commissioned by an Indigenous artist. For every t-shirt sold, proceeds are donated to a charity supporting Indigenous communities.

 

About the shirt

 

Our 2018 Design

About the shirt

A sweet grass braid with feathers. A mother cradles her child. Her braided hair forms an embrace. Her fingers run through her child’s hair and extend into feathers. The feathers represent the culture, language and traditions that would have been passed on from parent to child if it weren’t for the residential school system which removed children from family and community and stripped them of their identity. This devastation of forced assimilation can be seen in the empty space between the braid and the feathers. The mother appears stoic and tries to remain strong as she fights to hold back her emotions, but the child senses the mother’s pain.

James Darin Corbiere is Anishinaabe (Odawa) from Northern Ontario and belongs to the Bear Clan. His artwork emerged as he began to deal with trauma from his childhood and is an expression of both harm and healing. Darin is a former police officer and high school teacher. Ma’iingan Lisa Corbiere is of Irish and Anishinaabe decent from Ontario and belongs to the Marten Clan. The inspiration for this piece is drawn from her own experience of being removed from her mother and placed in an orphanage. Ma’iingan is a social worker. James and Ma’iingan live in British Columbia where they continue their journey of healing.

About the shirt

 

Our 2019 Design

 

About the shirt

Reconciliation should be ReconciliACTION. We need to see more hands-on reconciliation. This image portrays the strength of our people, holding on to sacred drum songs for the future generations. A pride was lost in the residential school system. CHILDREN taken from their families, hair cut off, are the connection to our past. Stripped of their identity... told to believe a new world. This image shows a young woman drumming and singing healing songs that were passed on from grandparents who suffered residential school terrors, but never lost their PRIDE, hiding their tears so the next generation could be proud of who they are and where they came from, protected by the eagle.

 

Kalum Teke Dan is a blackfoot artist and a member of southern Alberta’s Blood Tribe. His stunning work reflects a spirituality and realistic look at First Nations culture and traditions. He gathers his inspiration from actual people he’s met and respects for their inner strength and cultural pride.

About the shirt

 

About the shirt

 

Giving back to the community is an important part of our work as a member of the education community. In 2018 and 2019, we have helped Indigenous organizations that are actively involved in supporting Indigenous communities.

 

Our 2018 Partner

 

About the shirt

A shared vision held by those affected by Indian residential schools was to create a place of learning and dialogue where the truths of their experiences were honoured and kept safe for future generations. They wanted their families, communities and all of Canada to learn from these hard lessons so they would not be repeated. They wanted to share the wisdom of the Elders and Traditional Knowledge Keepers on how to create just and peaceful relationships amongst diverse peoples. They knew that Reconciliation is not only about the past; it is about the future that all Canadians will forge together. This vision is the legacy gift to all of Canada.

Our 2019 Partner

 

Jordan’s Principle is a child first principle named in memory of Jordan River Anderson. Jordan was a First Nations child from Norway House Cree Nation in Manitoba. Born with complex medical needs, Jordan spent more than two years unnecessarily in hospital while the Province of Manitoba and the federal government argued over who should pay for his at home care. Jordan died in the hospital at the age of five years old, never having spent a day in his family home. Jordan’s Principle ensures that First Nations children can access all public services when they need them. Services need to be culturally based and take into full account the historical disadvantage that many First Nations children live with. The government of first contact pays for the service and resolves jurisdictional/payment disputes later.

About the shirt

 

About the shirt

 

About the shirt

 

Together, let’s take action towards reconciliation on Orange Shirt Day by commemorating the survivors of residential schools and remembering the children who did not survive. Every Child Matters.

 

Every year on September 30th, we commemorate the survivors of residential schools and remember the children who did not survive. We invite everyone to join the journey toward reconciliation by buying an orange shirt with a special design commissioned by an Indigenous artist. For every t-shirt sold, proceeds are donated to a charity supporting Indigenous communities.

 

About the shirt

 

2018

About the shirt

A sweet grass braid with feathers. A mother cradles her child. Her braided hair forms an embrace. Her fingers run through her child’s hair and extend into feathers. The feathers represent the culture, language and traditions that would have been passed on from parent to child if it weren’t for the residential school system which removed children from family and community and stripped them of their identity. This devastation of forced assimilation can be seen in the empty space between the braid and the feathers. The mother appears stoic and tries to remain strong as she fights to hold back her emotions, but the child senses the mother’s pain.

James Darin Corbiere is Anishinaabe (Odawa) from Northern Ontario and belongs to the Bear Clan. His artwork emerged as he began to deal with trauma from his childhood and is an expression of both harm and healing. Darin is a former police officer and high school teacher. Ma’iingan Lisa Corbiere is of Irish and Anishinaabe decent from Ontario and belongs to the Marten Clan. The inspiration for this piece is drawn from her own experience of being removed from her mother and placed in an orphanage. Ma’iingan is a social worker. James and Ma’iingan live in British Columbia where they continue their journey of healing.

About the shirt

 

2019

 

About the shirt

Reconciliation should be ReconciliACTION. We need to see more hands-on reconciliation. This image portrays the strength of our people, holding on to sacred drum songs for the future generations. A pride was lost in the residential school system. CHILDREN taken from their families, hair cut off, are the connection to our past. Stripped of their identity... told to believe a new world. This image shows a young woman drumming and singing healing songs that were passed on from grandparents who suffered residential school terrors, but never lost their PRIDE, hiding their tears so the next generation could be proud of who they are and where they came from, protected by the eagle.

 

Kalum Teke Dan is a blackfoot artist and a member of southern Alberta’s Blood Tribe. His stunning work reflects a spirituality and realistic look at First Nations culture and traditions. He gathers his inspiration from actual people he’s met and respects for their inner strength and cultural pride.

About the shirt

 

About the shirt

 

Giving back to the community is an important part of our work as a member of the education community. In 2018 and 2019, we have helped Indigenous organizations that are actively involved in supporting Indigenous communities.

 

2018

 

About the shirt

A shared vision held by those affected by Indian residential schools was to create a place of learning and dialogue where the truths of their experiences were honoured and kept safe for future generations. They wanted their families, communities and all of Canada to learn from these hard lessons so they would not be repeated. They wanted to share the wisdom of the Elders and Traditional Knowledge Keepers on how to create just and peaceful relationships amongst diverse peoples. They knew that Reconciliation is not only about the past; it is about the future that all Canadians will forge together. This vision is the legacy gift to all of Canada.

2019

 

Jordan’s Principle is a child first principle named in memory of Jordan River Anderson. Jordan was a First Nations child from Norway House Cree Nation in Manitoba. Born with complex medical needs, Jordan spent more than two years unnecessarily in hospital while the Province of Manitoba and the federal government argued over who should pay for his at home care. Jordan died in the hospital at the age of five years old, never having spent a day in his family home. Jordan’s Principle ensures that First Nations children can access all public services when they need them. Services need to be culturally based and take into full account the historical disadvantage that many First Nations children live with. The government of first contact pays for the service and resolves jurisdictional/payment disputes later.

About the shirt

 

About the shirt

 

About the shirt

 

Together, let’s take action towards reconciliation on Orange Shirt Day by commemorating the survivors of residential schools and remembering the children who did not survive. Every Child Matters.